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LULU IN CHICAGO PUBLISHED IN GALLEYS ONLINE'S PREMIERE ISSUE
Posted on Wednesday October 7, 2009 at 8:51 pm
Downloads
GalleysOJL0101.pdf
GalleysOJL0101.swf
Hot off the press!!!

Andrea's poem Lulu in Chicago (Lilith) is published in Galleys Online's Premiere Issue.

You can check out the issue here by downloading this pdf or clicking on the flash video.

They will probably have the issue online eventually, if they do, we'll post a link.

Notes on this submission:

Andrea: With this submission, the editor asked me to provide an abstract for my poem which I found really helpful to do. So here is that abstract in all its gory glory:

This poem is about Lilith and a woman similarly named who lost her daughter and somehow she is to blame or is blamed for her death. She eventually lost her husband from neglect and the death of their child and runs away to Chicago to try to rebuild her life.

A more in-depth overview Ė

Each numbered section of the poem addresses different names and entities for Lilith except for part IV. Lilith is best known as the first wife of Adam in the Bible. She is a much maligned mythological and biblical figure. Alu is an asexual demon that took on the female attributes but later reverts back to a male demon. The speaker in the poem toys with the idea of becoming a man to overcome her grief and to make her life easier (or so she believes). Lamia devours children because her own children (the result of an affair with Zeus) are killed by an enraged Hera. But Lamia can never get the image of her own dead children out of her head. She canít even close her eyes. Part IV addresses the fluidity and irrevocable nature of life. The speakerís nickname, Lulu is a nod to Louise Brooks and her raw and unrepentant sexuality.

I try to play with gender and gender roles and mythology but mostly this poem is a story of unquenchable loss - the loss of a child and the horrifying question are you still a mother if your child is dead. Of course, you are but society makes it difficult.

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More about Galleys Online: Upon submitting this poem, I received a note from the editor giving me in-depth feedback on this poem. He helped me see it in a new light allowing me to revise more thoroughly than I would have been able to without his critique.

In case you didn't realize this -- it's highly unusual to receive any feedback when submitting (especially in regards to rejections or pieces just not quite there). Galleys Online seems to be one of those publications that fosters a dialogue with the submitting writers. And that is amazing and probably amazingly time-consuming.



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